Center for Behavioral and Decision Research at Carnegie Mellon CBDR home
     
 
Upcoming in the CBDR Seminar Series
Michael Lee  
 
       
  Thu, Jan 15 12:00pm PH223D
 
 
Cutting Edge Interdisciplinary Research


The Center for Behavioral and Decision Research (CBDR) provides a home for more than fifty researchers from a variety of disciplines such as behavioral economics, history, marketing, neuroscience, organizational behavior, public policy, political science, and psychology. The group meets to engage in a vigorous exchange of ideas with speakers from around the globe in weekly seminars and performs cutting edge interdisciplinary research at the intersection of these fields.

The center provides research support to its members in the form of a unique mixture of facilities, a team of dedicated research assistants, and direct funding for new research projects.

Topics of Interest

Affiliates investigate topics both on the forefront of their respective fields of research and of current interest to the public. Topics include (but are not limited to): Trust and fairness, memory and decision making, the neurological correlates of decision making, saving and spending behavior, , public health issues like prevention of sexually transmitted diseases and reduction in obesity, privacy, risk perception, managerial decision making, collective intelligence in teams, power and status, social networking, and dynamic decision processes.

In the News

The Center for Behavioral and Decision Research’s affiliates’ ground-breaking research and expert opinions are regularly featured in premier media outlets such as Time Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, US News & World Report, and CNN.
   
       
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